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Attack on Troy » Book Review

3300 years ago Agamemnon, king of Mycenae in Greece, attacked the city of Troy in western Anatolia. The bloody siege that followed gave rise to one of the most famous legends of the ancient world, and the search for the truth behind the legend has intrigued scholars ever since. In this fascinating new investigation Rodney Castleden reconsiders all the evidence in order to establish the facts and give a historical basis to the most potent myth of ancient warfare...

More: Attack on Troy » Barnes & Noble.com

Hot Archaeological Projects & Sites in Turkey, draft work sheet

Aizanoi: Roman city in west-central Anatolia, investigations directed by Deutsches Archäologisches Institut.
The Alcami: Richard Bayliss of the University of Newcastle, excavations, survey, and computer modeling of a late Roman basilica.
Alishar Höyük: The impact of the Hittite Imperialism is explored at this Anatolian settlement, by Ronald L. Gorny; an abstract from the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research.
Amuq Valley: Regional Project Results from recent investigations; complete .pdf article in American Journal of Archaeology by K.A. Yener et. al.
Aphrodisias: Recent excavations at this Greek and Roman period site; report in American Journal of Archaeology by R.R.R. Smith and Christopher Ratté
Aspendos: A brief description of this theater, built ca. 5th century BC.
Atskouri: Excavations by the University of Bilkent, occupation from 6th century BC to the present.
Ayasoluk: (Ephesus) Recent excavations centered on the Mycenaean occupation of this ancient city, an article fr…

Hittite Rhyton

Hittite Rhyton, originally uploaded by voyageAnatolia.blogspot.com.

Hittite rhyton at Anatolian Civilizations Museum at Ankara, a container from which fluids were intended to be drunk, or else poured in libation ceremony.

Guard of Limyra

Guard of Limyra, originally uploaded by voyageAnatolia.blogspot.com.In Roman mythology, fauns are place-spirits (genii) of untamed woodland. Romans connected their fauns with the Greek satyrs, followers of Bacchus (Greek Dionysus). The Romans also had a god named Faunus and goddess Fauna, who, like the fauns, were goat-people. In Greek mythology, Faunus' counterpart was Pan, companion of the nymphs, god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, fields, groves, and wooded glens, hunting and rustic music. Because of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The ancient Greeks also considered Pan to be the god of theatrical criticism. (Satire)

Circular Pilae Stacks of Arykanda

Circular Pilae Stacks of Arykanda, originally uploaded by voyageAnatolia.blogspot.com.

Rare Circular Roman Pilae Stacks of Arykanda

This architectural technique was the first form of underfloor heating and the same principle is still used today.

Myra Theatre

Gate of Myra Theatre, originally uploaded by voyageAnatolia.blogspot.com.

Partly excavated semi-circular Roman theatre of Myra. The theater was destroyed in an earthquake in 141, but rebuilt afterwards. Myra is an ancient town in Lycia, where the small town of Kale (Demre) is situated today Antalya Province of Turkey. Saint Nicholas of Myra lived here. We know him today as Santa Claus.

Fresco Detail at Church of St. Nicholas at Myra

Fresco Detail at Church of St. Nicholas at Myra, originally uploaded by voyageAnatolia.blogspot.com.

Myra is an ancient town in Lycia, where the small town of Kale (Demre) is situated today in present day Antalya Province of Turkey. Saint Nicholas of Myra lived here. We know him today as Santa Claus.