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Showing posts from June, 2009

Late Roman Shipwreck at Bodrum

Late Roman Shipwreck, originally uploaded by voyageAnatolia.blogspot.com.

Bodrum Gulets' Ancestor?

Replica of late Roman shipwreck stern reconstructed, submerged appropriately about A.D. 626 bearing in its hold a cargo of nearly a thousand wine amphorae, in the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology in Bodrum Castle of the Knights of St.John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta. The Uluburun Shipwreck, discovered off the south coast of Turkey in the Mediterranean Sea near the city of Kaş in the province of Antalya, dated of the Late Bronze Age period, 1400 B.C, 3400 years ago.

See amphoras at Alanya Museum.

Ancient Glass Work at Bodrum Museum

Ancient Glass Work at Bodrum Museum, originally uploaded by voyageAnatolia.blogspot.com.

Ancient glass work from 1400 BC to 1100 AD ancient cities of Kaunos and Stratonikea at Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology.

Archaeological evidence suggests that the first true glass was made in coastal north Syria, Mesopotamia or Old Kingdom Egypt.

Genie in a Bottle

Genie in a Bottle, originally uploaded by voyageAnatolia.blogspot.com.

Aladdin's Lamp? Ancient glass work from 1400 BC to 1100 AD ancient cities of Kaunos and Stratonikea at Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology.

Isauria: Exploring Ancient Sites in Turkey

Isauria, in ancient geography, is a rugged isolated district in the interior of South Asia Minor, of very different extent at different periods, but generally covering much of what is now Konya/Bozkir province of Turkey, or the core of the Taurus Mountains. It derives its name from the contentious Isaurian tribe and twin settlements Isaura Palaea (Old Isaura) and Isaura Nea (New Isaura). Isaurian marauders were fiercely independent mountain people who created havoc in neighboring districts under Macedonian and Roman occupations.